chapter 11 bankruptcy

It is the Chapter 11 bankruptcy law that allows businesses to seek the same protection and relief that individuals have a right to under the Federal bankruptcy statues. Any business entity, whether a large corporation, a small partnership or even a one-man sole proprietorship, can file under Chapter 11 in order to have their debts reorganized.

The Chapter 11 law requires that the business filing for brokeness, must provide full financial disclosure to the bankruptcy court. This means that the organization, or their attorney, must provide a complete and detailed list of all of the company’s assets, all of the liabilities and a complete statement of the financial status and affairs of the entity. Eric Ollason, Attorney at Law will help you in these issues.

Unlike other types of bankruptcies, according to Chapter 11 law, the debtor is able to act as his own trustee. In Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy cases, the court appoints a trustee.

When a debtor acts as a trustee in a Chapter 11 bankruptcy, it is known as a “debtor in possession” because the trustee maintains possession of the property. However, the court is able to appoint a different trustee to the case if there is just cause shown, such as in the case of mismanagement of the business entity.

After approximately one month from the time that filing for bankruptcy took place, the business and their bankruptcy attorney attend a meeting with the various creditors of the entity. According to Chapter 11 bankruptcy law, the company also is required to submit monthly activity reports that show the company’s income and expenses. These reports are also summarized in the form of a balance sheet and a profit and loss statement for the period.

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